Monday, 23 June 2014

Martin "Marty" Cooper

Martin "Marty" Cooper (born December 26, 1928 in Chicago, Illinois, United States is an American pioneer and visionary in the wireless communications industry.

 With eleven While at Motorola in the 1970s, Cooper conceived the first handheld mobile phone (distinct from the car phone) and led the team that developed it and brought it to market. He is considered the "father of the cell phone" and is also cited as the first person in history to make a handheld cellular phone call in public.
Cooper is co-founder of numerous successful communications companies with his wife and busines
s partner Arlene Harris; also known as the "first lady of wireless." He is currently co-founder and Chairman of Dyna LLC, in Del Mar, California. Cooper also sits on committees supporting the Federal Communications Commission and the United States Department of Commerce.

Friday, 13 June 2014

James Arthur Gosling

James Arthur Gosling,  (born May 19, 1955) is a Canadian computer scientist, best known as the father of the Java programming language.
Gosling is generally credited with having invented the Java programming language in 1994. He created the original design of Java and implemented the language's original compiler and virtual. Gosling traces the origins of the approach to his early 19s graduate-student days, when he created a pseudo-code (p-code) virtual machine for the lab's DEC VAX computer, so that his professor could run programs written in UCSD Pascal. Pascal compiled into p-code to foster precisely this kind of portability. In the work leading to Java at Sun, he saw that architecture-neutral execution for widely distributed programs could be achieved by implementing a similar philosophy: always program for the same virtual machine.
For his achievement he was elected to Foreign Associate member of the United States National Academy of Engineering. He has also made major contributions to several other software systems, such as News and Gosling Emacs. He co-wrote the "bundle" program, a utility thoroughly detailed in Brian Kernighan and Rob Pike's book The Unix Programming Environment.
Gosling pied a Bill Gates impersonator on stage during the Worldwide Java One Developer Conference in 1998.

Robert Hutchings Goddard

Robert Hutchings Goddard (October 5, 1882 – August 10, 1945) was an American professor, physicist, and inventor who is credited with creating and building the world's first fueled rocket, which he successfully launched on March 16, 1926. Goddard and his team launched 34 rockets between 1926 and 1941, achieving altitudes as high as 2.6 km (1.6 mi) and speeds as high as 885 km/h (550 mph).
Goddard's work as both theorist and engineer anticipated many of the developments that were to make spaceflight possible. He has been called the man who ushered in the Space Age two of Goddard's 214 patented inventions — a multi-stage rocket (1914), and a liquid-fuel rocket (1914) — were important milestones toward spaceflight. His 1919 monograph A Method of Reaching Extreme Altitudes is considered one of the classic texts of 20th-century rocket science. Goddard successfully applied three-axis control, gyroscopes and steerable thrust to rockets, to effectively control their flight.
Although his work in the field was revolutionary, Goddard received very little public support for his research and development work. The press sometimes ridiculed his theories of spaceflight. As a result, he became protective of his privacy and his work. Years after his death, at the dawn of the Space Age, he came to be recognized as the founding father of modern rocketry. He not only recognized the potential of rockets for atmospheric research, ballistic missiles and space travel but was the first to scientifically study, design and constructs the rockets neededto implement those ideas.

Tim Berners-Lee

Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web in 1989, about 20 years after the first connection was established over what is today known as the internet. At the time, Tim was a software engineer at CERN, the large particle physics laboratory near Geneva, Switzerland. Many scientists participated in experiments at CERN for extended periods of time, then returned to their laboratories around the world. These scientists were eager to exchange data and results, but had difficulties doing so. Tim understood this need, and understood the unrealized potential of millions of computers connected together through the Internet.

Tim Berners-Lee.
Tim documented what was to become the World Wide Web with the submission of a proposal to his management At CERN, in late 1989 , This proposal specified a set of technologies that would make the Internet truly accessible and useful to people. Believe it or not, Tim’s initial proposal was not immediately accepted.